24 mins read time

How Radical Honesty And Transparency Will Impact Your Company Culture

On this episode of the Virtual Frontier, we’re joined by Astrid Schrader. Astrid is an entrepreneur, personal growth strategist and team coach.

Manuel, Daniel and Astrid had a great conversation talking about company culture and leadership.

Listen to the episode below:

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Full episode transcript below:

CHRIS REEVES

Hello, and welcome to the virtual frontier, the podcast about virtual teams created by virtual team. I’m Chris and I’m part of the team here at flash hub. On today’s episode, we have Astrid Schrader. Astrid is an entrepreneur, personal growth strategist and team coach, Manuel Daniel and Astrid had an awesome conversation about company culture and leadership. So here is Episode 12 of the virtual frontier, featuring our guest, Astrid Schrader,

DANIEL GUAPER

as you are our guest today, do, you might want to go ahead first and give us a short overview about yourself from where you’re coming, and where you might heading in the future? Take it over.

ASTRID SCHRADER

Cool. Yeah. Hi. Thanks for having me. I’m German, as German as a guest. And I’m running an organization called the Arc, which is the international training flash coaching network, and international retreats boot camp, but also coaching is across Europe. So yeah, we are an entirely remote teams of 10 to 20 freelancers, and also working in the area where we are dealing with very personal stories with a lot of emotions. So remote work has always been yeah, quite an interesting topic for us. That’s one company. And I’m also having a second company where we can help social organizations on their financial transactions to very, fairly different lives. And I guess that’s about me for now.

MANUEL PISTNER

Cool. Yeah. Then, let me shortly introduce myself. My name is Manuel, I’m founder and CEO of bright solutions, former digital agency, and I’m also founder of flash up virtual teams as a service. And I met Astrid, at a TEDx conference. And we were talking about culture, jeans, and many, many different things from the human factor of a team to the DNA of a team of a local team of a virtual team. And you ask you is what is generally required to build a high performance team in general, not related to virtual teams?

ASTRID SCHRADER

I will answer for the industry, I guess, because when before I founded this company, I’ve worked like 10 years or something in management, consulting, and I really feel that part of industry, what makes it performing team is quite different. But when you are in the people business, as I would call the industry I’m in, I love the statement, and saying we measure the quality of teams, the amount of truth being told. So the classical situation I have in mind is when two team members meet, and one says, Look, what you do is was I don’t know, maybe not the best thing, the other person just says, Thank you. And I love this metaphor, because this is what it means to have this high performing team. It’s where mistakes are not a bad thing. Like they’re not a good thing. But you don’t all the politics in your way. You can just talk about what matters. And there is trust for you to walk up to your colleague saying, Here, I’ve made a mistake here. How do we solve this? It’s really, and of course, you have all these other things like, yeah, you have to have really smart people. You have to have I know functioning IT. But I feel that the very best teams are really differentiating through their radical sincerity, that radical honesty.

MANUEL PISTNER

And beside this honesty and transparency, I mean, this is more the culture of the team. But what about measuring outcomes, like OKRs, KPIs? Because they really determined the real performance, the output of everything that the team does? How do you see?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah. I wonder if I give you any cool OKRs that are more interesting. profitability, productivity, customer ratings. I don’t know. Again, if I would answer from my self. Well, we have we have impact measurement. Well, indicators, so to say we don’t call them OKRs, we call them impact measurement indicators. And, I mean, I’m in the coaching business. So one, goal indicator that we use is the percentage of coaching objectives and reached, yeah. And we also have like a one year evaluation, for instance, or we asked, okay, as a result of our coach, have you changed your life in a way that it has become an inspiration for yourself and to others, and I should probably add records that this is really what our organization stands for. We are, our mission is really to coach people to a level where their impact inspires themselves and others, and hey, that’s the goal. But yeah, and we’re pretty proud of our our results right now. I think the one year evaluation is up to 90 to 100%. So literally 90 to 100% say that as a result of our project, our coaching audience, they have pulled into life, pull off something in their life, which is an inspiration themselves and others. And yeah, also the number of coaching objectives being reached, we’re between 80 and 100%. So, I mean, we’re excited about it. I’m not sure it’s a good KPI for everybody, but it works for us.

MANUEL PISTNER

Okay, and do you think there is a difference between a local team or a virtual team? What do they have in common? And what’s the difference? And how to deal with these differences to make both a high performance team?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah. So that’s such an interesting question.

MANUEL PISTNER

That’s good to hear.

ASTRID SCHRADER

Like, you asked, I say this, because we both local and so our events, the entire team is going to be on site. But the rest of the year, we are remote. And some people do many events, other people do just fewer events. So it’s really quite an exotic mix to be honest. And what I feel we have so as organize these boot camps, which are these crazy, crazy, intense coaching event. And, so one of the challenges we are facing is that once we have the team on site literally have between one and three days to turn into a team that can lead people through very intense personal processes. And, yeah, the way we do this is we have a couple of values that really, really stand for. And I think I mean, radical sincerity as you can imagine one of them. And another one is called don’t waste people’s time. And that’s an I think that’s what we’re really trying to do. So to give a bit more context, one of the things we are doing is we are playing value. So when we say count the bullshit and be radically sincere one question we take very seriously. And that’s one simple question. How are you? Yeah, so and you’ll find a massive amount of time being dedicated to check in’s on our meetings? And, yeah, really asking people okay, what’s what’s in you? What’s triggering you these days? Yeah, because that’s when you are in the people business a matter of element of our work, right? If you are, let’s say going through, I don’t know, a separation and your love life, for instance, and you’re trying to coach someone on how to get over separation, like you are going to massively influence what is happening in your life right now. And the level of honesty at which you’re facing your own truth will be completely influencing the level at which you can coach someone else. So now, this is just for us. And if I was to generalize this for four more teams, guess the biggest learning I’ve had from, you know, leading teams, I don’t know online, offline, but also in industries is

ASTRID SCHRADER

you attract people, the kind of people that will fit the culture that you have already implemented in your organization. So I like to say if you want people who have great impact, being organization, or be the leader, be the kind of leader who had great results, who has a great impact. You know, if you want to have people who are super upbeat, who are like the craziest party guys, like I don’t know, maybe sales teams are really like a cool place for the be that party god I you know, and if you will, crazy program, or, you know, like, I either be that crazy program, or yourself or, and I know, it’s not really a thing and a lot of startups that the team leaders are the best programmer and create an environment where great program is thrive. So I think this is really the the overall learning that i have deduced from working both online and offline. And I know I’ve talked about offline space. But if you were to translate that to the online space, I think this principle still is true. You know. So also when we work online, it’s not not just, because our people are remote doesn’t mean that we don’t have same level of sharing, we don’t have the same intensity at which we will ask people “So what are the topics that are on your mind right now? What kind of coach Do you want to be this event? How do you want to create?” Yeah, I hope. I hope that makes sense.

MANUEL PISTNER

Yes that makes absolut sense. I remember, you said that you in your in your camps, you try to put people into a very personal intense experience.

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah.

MANUEL PISTNER

Any example of what that means?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yes. So just to give some context. As I said before, like what we, what our mission is, is to really, yeah, lift people up to a level that they can inspire themselves and others. So most people that we work with, this means that they pull off their incredible and their work life. So we work with a lot of super talented millennials who have a situation that are that talented, they’re growing, they’re theoretically capable of growing fast, but they’ve kind of hit this hit an end and current career or job position. So lot of times people like work in a big corporation, and they want to, I don’t know, maybe their own company, maybe they just want to also just discover their own niche within their organization that’s really their own. They don’t even know exactly what inspiring thing it is they’re supposed to be pulling off and just want to start getting some passion project off the ground. But no matter what it is, what we the way we work is, how do you coach someone to be inspired? And we say, okay, so you got your comfort zone, and you leave your comfort zone? Because you’re trust, you’re dream more than you trust, your fear? And yeah, in 2012, I thought, why don’t we move it around that? Why don’t we finally make a training event that actually work? And and when you talk about these intense processes, this is what we are exploring with people. So the first one we are asking is okay, what are the situations that make you sweat that makes you go on a pilot that are so scare you, you don’t even put yourself into it. So the classic is like you are starting entrepreneur, but you despise pitching. You are freaking scared of pitching your company to anyone. So guess what’s going to happen? You’re going to stay small and moneyless . So that’s the first step. The second is around. If you were not to blame yourself for the things that make you happy, what would be the one dream that one vision that you would stand up for that is worth fighting for? That is so come so deeply from you, that you Yeah, everything. I like to say that moms The King’s Speech that you yourself would give, and it’s a topic for people that oftentimes is even harder. We we are skilled in our society, I believe to talk about where we stuck, where our fears are, but we’re really struggling to say yes to our passions to our dreams. Yeah, so what for people that that’s oftentimes and even harder. So interestingly talking about what you want, and and and getting ready for taking that, you know, going to like that big life buffet and saying, you know, what I’m gonna freakin go for this is for many people, even a scarier process. And then of course, the third part of talk about Okay, what number one obstacle in your way, like, seriously, like, I’m not talking about, you know, that little bit of self doubt that you may be have, but like the deep fears, potentially, even the traumas that are locked in you that hold you back, you know, big, like a big one. Or Also, I’m going to say this, you know, like, a lot of women in my age was like, the I am not good enough. Or the, I don’t know, like it like all the all the what the number one big belief that really messes with you that that stops you from going for, for what you want and be courageous. And at is sort of the third big area where where people are having Yeah, of intense moments of admitting to yourself that sort of burn you. So I hope that answered, I don’t know if that answered your question.

MANUEL PISTNER

Yes, it does. I just wondering Is that kind of coaching is mostly for founders or managers, so people that have high amount of responsibility and faced many challenges every day. So they need to develop their personality, would you recommend to do or to give this kind of experience to any kind of employee in a team?

ASTRID SCHRADER

It’s an interesting question. We do that. So there are some organization that hire us to do some processes with their employees. And is it always necessary to do it for every single employee and not sure. But if you want to have a purpose driven organization, where people take their destiny in their head and take over responsibility for their own growth, such processes are honestly gold, like people really learn what it means find, what they want, and to assemble the courage to go and get it. So I think for a lot of startups, this is awesome. For every company, like every corporation, I’m not sure. I’m not sure all companies want that. And, and there is also a purpose and a space for organization that give primarily safety to their employees, and where you don’t have to know always fulfill your dreams and your destiny. And I don’t know what you know. So yeah, I think there’s really a space for both, but hey, I mean, I would not be running this company, if I had not a big passion and a big belief into people taking charge of their own professional development.

MANUEL PISTNER

I’m just wondering how this will look like in very classical and hirachical organizations who are even talking to each other with a formal you in German to Sie you know,

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, yeah.And, you know what?

MANUEL PISTNER

And, it’s very personal.

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, it’s quite interesting.

I had just two weeks ago, run a one day workshop at one of those organizations where we had the senior management, admittedly, it wasn’t in the marketing space, it wasn’t like something completely take your engineers, but, but people who really grew up in a hierarchical formal setting. And what I felt this was such a big learning for me. If the person if you, I mean, I have a facilitator, right, but if you as a team leader, or as a facilitator, believe, and really live by these processes. I was just so shocked and surprised how openly, people would follow. And I think for just some examples, you know, we sometimes we do crazy exercise what, let’s say exercises that are crazy and such environments, from you know, eye gazing to talking about really, really personal topics and, and talking about your personal fears, talking about what messes with you, what Fu.. you what, what keeps you awake at night, these were things that they had never really shared before. And it was incredible how after, like, honestly, 45 minutes into the training seminar, people were just completely open up about their, about their depression, about their family about deaths in their surroundings about Yeah, how they’re scared of being being homosexual, to really, really personal stories. And, also, for me, this was actually a new thing, I was a bit timid, to be honest. I wasn’t sure they would follow. But what I’m learning more and more is that, but have this very deep need to connect. And if you give them a space where they are allowed to do that, and not feel embarrassed, like these days and having great experiences with with experimenting with that. But yeah, you have I think we have to overcome our own hesitation will put people in such scary places.

MANUEL PISTNER

Yeah, that’s also my experience. I mean, if the best projects that I ever had, were those where we got personally in the team, not only in the internal project team, but also with the customers. On the other side, I face customers, if I tried to talk to them personally in German.

Like, Oh, no.

I will not talk, this personal relationship with you. So some people they fear that. And I’m wondering if you were talking about events, like boot camps, or you have a coaching. Are there specific habits that a team can develop to foster these personal experiences?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah. So I want to react to things first of all, that you when you meet people who are just, as you say, probably quite, quite, I don’t wanna say correctly, because obviously, I don’t know for everybody. People are fearful to be truly themselves. And such conversations. I have this big value like, never coach without sense. And I think people being fearful, tells you something about how safe they feel. And if they don’t feel safe, talking about personal things will not make the whole conversation more safe, but it will make it less safe. And this is going to be you know, pushing people even like extreme case, that will be pushing people into panic zone. And that’s not where growth happens. You know, growth happens at the edge of the comfort zone. Right, but not in panic zone. So that’s really the first thing and so when you talk about teams,and fostering such, let’s say she cheesy word rituals or such attitudes within teams. I think, what what on an abstract level, what needs to happen is that the team, you know, step by step learns to bear honesty and sincerity. And, yeah, I think like rituals really are like, asking, like, we have check-ins. And at every single telephone conference, we have like a check in and checking goes, Okay, three minutes, one minute, or even just one word, how are you? Yeah. And and we ask this because these emotions are going to be in the room anyways, you know, if someone has just, I don’t know, I had a parking ticket, that person was not going to be in the best mood, it’s going to influence the meeting, whether you want it or not. And so that’s one part, but also how to such things and how to help people to actually be authentic in this is, a person who is leading the meeting, if that person takes the answer seriously. We might be surprised about that person’s power to actually set the culture. So yeah, asking for you. And really like taking it serious. Like, I remember at some point, I really learned from one of my colleagues, called Ariana and we were in a team meeting. And I was honest, I was leading the meeting, and I was dressed like hell, I just wanted to get the results done. And I just wanted to have it work. And I remember Ariana just interrupted the whole thing saying, you know what, guys, I think the atmosphere here was just terrible. So let’s just have like a check in and see what’s what’s going on in the room. Because everyone’s just like, so annoyed and negative. And I was like, wow, this was actually the right thing do so and I talked about, I quickly like five minutes, and then afterwards, literally, whole process went completely smoothly. So I think I’m sure every team needs to find their own way of intervening, and interventions. But I definitely think that teams can learn this. Right? And then summarizing this answer, it gets really creating an awareness about the invisible things that are going on in the room.

MANUEL PISTNER

Hmm, yeah, it makes total sense. What do you do with a scenario? Where do you ask a person during the check in? How are you and you get the answer? Good. And, and you? Do you do you really deeper? Or do you accept the Good on the surface

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, it’s a, it…

I think that this brings me to the constant question. So person does not want to share, like, that’s fine. You know, like, for me, then that means, okay, maybe I have to create more safety. And then the question is that person need, what does a person need? You know, if that person just never wants to share? Like, I mean, for me, at a certain level, that’s fine. You know, I want to be honest, I wouldn’t do much. I like to have a more like a full strategy. Other people start to tell about how they’re doing. And and also, I mentioned things that pissed them off, you know, like, hey, what you said in the meeting was shit, and, and so people kind of get a bit envious of other people sharing that, and usually in the next time, and then we’ll just join in.

Yeah, but I think, for me, that’s really case to case based. I don’t know if that helps you, if you have someone in mind and in your team.

MANUEL PISTNER

I just see that, whenever we have a meeting, especially when you ever meet the first time, or even you know, you are daily stand up, and then you ask, “How are you?” “Yes, I’m good.” Most people say thanks. I’m good, because they are used to react in that way you get the question? And that’s why I’m wondering if, if it would make sense not to accept question/answert good?

ASTIRD SCHRADER

Yeah, gotcha. Yeah, yeah, that is, like in stand ups, where you have like, six to eight people. And they they all like, so I’m good.

In that particular situation, I think what I would, if I wanted to have some more connection going on, but people, I think I will make a bit of a PR speech for the method, like, what are the benefits of talking about this? You know, and, of course, you can just invention benefits, but like, Why? Why would What are reasons for them to actually share something? You know, for instance, let’s say, I don’t know, I have, like, maybe there’s some problems, you know, like, maybe there’s some problems in the company like, and you have to, I don’t know, outsource for parts. Let’s just make up an example. And then you ask, how are you? And people say, good, and you? Well, I’m, I know, I’m not buying it. And I’m sure you you can make like fitted space of like, say, Okay, let’s 20 minutes, I don’t know, after our team meeting, and here’s the thing, we want to be this company where people feel safe enough to share what they’re really feeling. Because I want to take this team serious, I think you guys are like, look serious people who I want to actually listen to learn from and work with. So what about we take 20 minutes, and everybody shares what they’re really thinking? Like, I’m censored truth, you know, and I’m just going to listen, and I’m not going to criticize, I’m just going to take in, you know, and and so you. Yeah, that could be for like a mini PR speech. You know, but I mean, I would have really adapted to, to what the people want. So yeah.

MANUEL PISTNER

You see organization all around the world, and also in Germany, to adapt an agile approach to, which means to transform to self organizing teams. What do you think employees need to be taught or experience which skills or experience they need to bring to be able to work in a self organizing team, or is it for everyone?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, I’m quite curious what your experiences as well, actually.

From my personal experience, I don’t think it’s for everybody. As I’ve said before, I think there’s space for companies and organizations that mainly provide safety. I feel that you know, living in a country like Germany, where we have a functioning economy right now. It’s, it’s a great privilege that we that such spaces can be provided. I also think there is a cool space for adventure and experimentation.

So and that’s where I locate these type of organizing teams, you know, like the whole design philosophy about reacting to change quickly, being flexible, throwing out your darlings, like your little project, and pivoting all time and not getting too attached to one of them. And I think the skills that people in all it like the attitudes more so than skills, they need to bring our sure, you have to be open to as I say, kill your darlings. You know, like you have this project and boom, maybe the next day, someone finds out that it’s not good enough, and, you know, not not be too attached. That’s the first thing. I also think people have to be kind of addicted to growth. Yeah. Because I think in self organizing teams, you really have to be willing to let go of, of so many labels around what are the activities that you are doing on a day to day basis? What is your job title? And the biggest assumption that people oftentimes join a company with, you also have to look go up. And that is the assumption, hey, I’m going to do this job forever. You know, so I think, yeah, you definitely need someone who is very confident in their own skills, who will, who will speak up as well. And and who was open to to, and letting go of all those labels and to discussing this with others.

So that’s my experience. But I’m curious what are yours.

MANUEL PISTNER

Because our whole organization within like three months from Yeah, classical organization, or hierarchical organization, to a self organized organization with full transparency and virtual teams of 150, freelancers, all around the world, there was a huge change. And I thought in the very beginning, that I personally would love to work in such an organization where I’m free, where I’m independent, self determined, etc. And I assumed that others like this as well, when I presented them all the benefits that this culture would have. They were all saying, Oh, yes, transparency is great. I want to be free to make holidays, vacations whenever I want. If I can determine my own salary, perfect if I have full responsibility for everything, and I can control things in my environment, good thing. But on the other side, in the same way, you want to be free and independent, you need to be disciplined. And this is one thing that most people didn’t understand. They need to be disciplined and take ownership and responsibility not only of their work, but also for themselves.

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yes.

MANUEL PISTNER

And it’s easier, and they are used to get an advice and execute it. So most people are used to that. So we are, yeah, we have this culture still. But now we let people decide more and more, if they want to be in a position where they are, like a leader where they are free and independent, self determined, etc. and take responsibility and ownership themselves and their team. And then we also give other people the opportunity to join a team and be like, yeah, a follower. So this is very important, because as you said not everyone is made to work in such an environment.

Yeah, that’s definitely the case. And this is something if some of our listeners in the audience of wants to try that. Don’t do it in the most radical way. If you want to get my experience, I can definitely share it with you. But do it step by step and try to ask people what they really want. Not by asking them. Do you want freedom? Yes. Do you want self determination? Yes. But also try to make them aware of what that means as a consequence? Yeah, having responsibility and the discipline. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. That’s an interesting thing. Now to the last question, if there is a startup that was founded like a month ago, and they want to build a strong culture, where they attract people that are high performers and want to work in such a self determined, transparent organization. What do you think is the most important thing to start with to build this culture or this DNA?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah. And we’re going to have a very concise answer to this.

MANUEL PISTNER

O my god.

ASTRID SCHRADER

I feel. it’s work on the personal development of the founders.

Why? So one thing I have repeatedly observed when being a management consultant, but also in coaching, all these startup teams is the personalities of the founders, and the founding team. Or let’s say the bosses, will magically difuse through the whole pyramid. Like, yes, we all learn, don’t hire by your own image, but we do. And if I am someone who was massively risk of us, someone who loves risk, and who will just invest a crazy amount of money in some untested something will have won’t have a very strong foothold in my organization, if that person even gets hired, which is already quite unlikely, I would say. So what I like to say as because the personalities of the founders will trickle down through the organization anyways, I say, don’t make coincidence. Be the main trainer of your psychological set, you know, your aspirations and your fears, both will determine where your organization is going go for, and what also what are the weak points of your organization. So again, Know yourself, and then you can build the organization that you really want. The one thing that doesn’t work. And I see this being done a lot else, hey, let’s make a culture workshop. Let’s list 10 things that we love, and write them on the flip side, and say, hey, these are our venues now, but nobody reacts, nobody, according to them. And oftentimes, the things that end up on that flip chart are the things that everybody knows this organization sucks at, you know, so I let’s be more honest, in a group of people who are utterly dishonest. Oh, and let’s appreciate each other more. And, you know, people who are not very appreciative of each other’s work, because they’re all on fear. So the one thing I think doesn’t work, that you write down these values and flip things, that you are actually worst it, and then just decide, we’re going to be good at the starting now. Nobody lives the rules, and nobody lives by it. And yeah, for me, this is when people really dissociate from the values and the soul the company tries to represent.

MANUEL PISTNER

So it’s really about the core of the company, which is in the very beginning, the founder, organization, needs strong core and major, major personality of the founder, and everything else that you just ride on the flip chart, which you’re reading on the surface, but not digging deeper into the real core. Right? Yeah,

ASTRID SCHRADER

kind of like this. Yeah, yeah, maybe? Yeah. Sorry. Go. Go ahead. No, I just wanted to say, I think you can write things on a flip chart. But these things should be meaningful, and if they are meaningful, if people lead by example. And, yeah, what you can’t do is write something on a on a flip chart, like honesty or appreciation or respect, and not live by it and expect this to be the company value for some magic reason.

MANUEL PISTNER

I absolutely agree, I experienced the same thing. So in the very beginning, when I started my business, I went through almost everything from being a weak founder without any experience, just were a programmer and hire people that were programmers, but I expected them to be a leader in the beginning of the organization to do project management, whatever. And then I realized that, yeah, it’s always my fault. If things go wrong, they always come back to me and to myself. And this is where I’m, where the change needs to happen only if this, this core is strong enough. And basically speaking, you know, as a founder, what you really you want, then you can give this spirit and this vision to others so they can follow it or just executed it? Yeah.

ASTRID SCHRADER

What do you what was your biggest value? What do you feel is like the biggest value that you like to stand up for in your organization?

MANUEL PISTNER

Transparency and honesty. Those are the the most most important things for me, I hate when people just hide things. And we are talking bullshit around the real core the real meaning of a problem or a subject and solve it together. And, yeah, I am a huge fan of success. Of course, I like when I have a team around me that really pushed to the limit and tries to achieve something special. And not just doing the daily work. Of course, they need to be people that just do the daily work, otherwise, the leaders that push and run for division

Both needs to exist. That transparency is definitely one thing that is very, very important for me. And for you?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, I also hear a lot of ambition from you. And for us its, we like …… quite similar, but we use the word sincerety. So yes, sincerity. We also really run on courage. And yeah, the last one was quite cheesy like to put love on the equation as well. Really, we are really liked very lovable organization

Yeah, yeah. And of course, like, the PS, we put work hard party hard.

MANUEL PISTNER

That’s what I did from the very beginning that we always celebrate success. Yeah. Yeah. Otherwise, you will always be in the day to day business, and you will never be able to celebrate something because you take it for granted that you have. Yeah, but she’s something. Okay, we did that. But we had to do that. So next thing, your next goal, and nobody’s aware of that we achieve great things. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, something else that you want to ask me?

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, so one thing I’ve really wondered, I remember when we were in the speakers, cabin, when we had the whole TEDx thing going on, and I was like to talk from from afar. And I was really, I was listening to your story and founded so the words not gonna sound admirable, maybe the wrong word. But we sort of all inspiring when you’re talking about through how many bumps you have been? And I, I think one question I, I always wanted to ask you is, like, for me, its own sometimes incredible to like, go. And I’m curious, like, what, what’s in your head or in your heart or in your gut that you like, some if all these storms like again, and again, and again,

I feel like I want to copy that from you, instead of like, injected into my own veins.

MANUEL PISTNER

My, my, I have two things in my mind, I never, never want to give up. This is what I stand for, from the very beginning, never, ever give up. This is the most important thing. And whenever there is a problem, I know, okay, there is a problem, I have to solve it no matter what, no matter how. And from that point, when I understand what I need to do to solve the problem. That’s totally fine. For me, I do everything that needs to be done to solve this problem. What is very, very hard for me if I feel helpless, and I have a situation, and I have no idea

ASTRID SCHRADER

that makes a lot of sense.

MANUEL PISTNER

We had we had some things in the past some situations where I realized it’s not going in the right way. But I had no idea what to do. And I was just trying and trying and trying and always, in my mind never give up. So at some point, it was fixed. And that gave me the experience that whenever you want to reach something, and you make it your most important attitude to never give up you, you will succeed. Sometimes it takes a little bit longer, but at the end it will succeed.

ASTRID SCHRADER

So what do you do these one, when you feel helpless, just out of curiosity.

MANUEL PISTNER

I so, okay, when I when I feel helpless, and I tried too much, then I’m always very deeply involved and emotionally attached, I understand I will not find the solution. And then I go to sports. And I try to be very, very exhausted. very exhausted and things from outer perspective. And that usually helps I understand I personally I able to solve a problem by myself. So I need to ask somebody else to request help. Or I just understand, okay, I need to try different things. And from an outer perspective, it’s most likely easier to understand which options you have, and then pick one and go for it. But these are the mechanisms that I have developed. Because I understand when my body’s completely exhausted, my mind works better and less emotionally attached.

ASTIRD SCHRADER

Cool. Interesting Strategy

MANUEL PISTNER

Works for me, personally, does not necessarily mean that it works for everyone, but it’s worth trying. Yeah, okay. Cool. Yeah. Then it was a very exciting talk. Thanks a lot for your time. It’s very inspiring for myself as well. And and just let us know where people can find you on social media or online.

ASTRID SCHRADER

Yeah, so online, we are www.thearctraining.org and arc with a c

And on YouTube, we are The Acr tribe. We have our own YouTube channel. Facebook, you will find us if you….. Yeah, and I guess generally just go with my name as you probably well. It’s like arc stuff all over my profile so hard to miss.

We are really chatty. We love to get in touch with people.

MANUEL PISTNER

It’s not so hard to get in touch with you.

ASTRID SCHRADER

No, not not at all.

MANUEL PISTNER

Perfect, so I hope some people will find their way to you if they need good coaching or want to develop their personality for being a great founder. Then thanks a lot for joining us. And yeah, have a good day. Cool.

ASTRID SCHRADER

So have a wonderful day too.

MANUEL PISTNER

Thanks. Bye bye.

CHRIS REEVES

I’d like to thank our guest Astro Schrader for joining us today. You can find out more about Astrid on our LinkedIn page that is linked in the show notes. You can subscribe to the Virtual Frontier or leave us a review at Apple Podcast cast Google Play Stitcher or anywhere else podcasts are found. If you want to learn more about virtual teams as a service, visit flashhub.io. On behalf of the team here at Flashhub, I’d like to thank you for listening. So until next episode, keep exploring new frontiers.

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